The women who marched on World Refugee Day


Hundreds of New Yorkers from immigrant communities and other activists staged a march and rally in observance of World Refugee Day on Wednesday. This march, unlike the Women’s March earlier this year, fell on a weekday. Marchers came from work, some having picked up their children from childcare to bring them along. They came before dinnertime and rush hour. They held signs of refugees who died in transit, carried rafts above their heads, and pushed empty strollers to send a message to the administration: “When refugees are under attack — stand up, fight back.”

President Trump’s hardline immigration stances — including this week’s firestorm over separating Hundreds of New Yorkers from immigrant communities and other activists staged a march and rally in observance of World Refugee Day on Wednesday. This march, unlike the Women’s March earlier this year, fell on a weekday. Marchers came from work, some having picked up their children from childcare to bring them along. They came before dinnertime and rush hour. They held signs of refugees who died in transit, carried rafts above their heads, and pushed empty strollers to send a message to the administration: “When refugees are under attack — stand up, fight back.”

President Trump’s hardline immigration stances — including this week’s firestorm over separating children from families when they illegally cross the U.S. border seeking asylum — created a new atmosphere of urgency in this year’s march.Many of the people who showed up were women.children from families when they illegally cross the U.S. border seeking asylum — created a new atmosphere of urgency in this year’s march.

Many of the people who showed up were women.

Take Jane, for instance, who came to America in 1990 with her parents. When asked why she showed up to march, she replied: “It’s not hard to come down here and protest. Where else would I be? At the movies? Home watching this on TV?”

Jane said she feels a personal responsibility to draw attention to refugees and immigrants suffering. “I was a refugee from the Soviet Union,” she said. “Now I am a U.S. citizen. I was in the political refugee program to bring Jewish people from the Soviet Union, but I was never in a refugee camp. It was sheer luck that I was able to come here and get to be white in this country.”

Becoming a citizen gave her a sense of permanence, a feeling she said other refugees are seeking. “People don’t just come here to earn money,” she said, before reciting a quote she read earlier today: “No one puts their children on a boat unless the water is safer than the land.”

Continue reading on Yahoo News

KadiaScope

©2020 KadiaScope by Kadia Tubman